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IIT editorial
1972 IIT TECH NEWS
1972 IIT TECH NEWS
1972 IIT TECH NEWS-1
1972 IIT TECH NEWS
IIT Technology News
1972 IIT TECH NEWS-1
1972 IIT TECH NEWS-4

CHICAGO DOWNTOWN

WINDY CITY

Chicago, Chicago
Chicago, Chicago
Chicago, Chicago
Chicago, Chicago
Chicago, Chicago

STILL WAITING FOR HER LETTER?

GOING TO THE HOOD?

Chicago, Chicago
Chicago

YUP, YEAR OF THE HORSE IS HERE.

NO COMMENT.
Chicago
Chicago
BANNERS DESIGNED FOR A POLITICAL RALLY.
Chicago, windy city
1975 CHICAGO MISC

Life as expacts in Chicago.

YOUR DISHWASHER QUIT AGAIN?
OURS IS OLD BUT RELIABLE.
Ugh, this flavor reminds me of dandelions. I really
wish I could understand Chinese signs.

1971-1980 Chicago and United Airlines

Having traversed the country for a span of 9 months, I eventually returned to Chicago and enrolled at the Illinois Institute of Technology (IIT) to pursue a master's degree in architecture. Upon settling into the campus, my first order of business was submitting my cartoons to the campus paper, IIT Tech News, and I was delighted to be accepted. It marked a significant milestone as my initial cartoon published in the United States, a feat achieved within two years of my arrival.

Once classes commenced, I discovered that all instructors were actively practicing architects or engineers, with teaching slots primarily available on weekends. Consequently, I sought and secured a full-time position as a draftsman at C.F. Murphy, a renowned architectural firm in Chicago, where I briefly worked under the world-renowned architect Helmut Jahn.

United airlines

A colleague of mine at United Airlines once remarked that I have a "rotten sense of humor," which I considered possibly the finest compliment I've ever received. As time passed, "rotten" evolved into "wacky" (sounds much better), giving birth to my Wacky World of cartooning.

THE FUNKY SKIES.

Funky Skies, United Airlines, Chicago
Funky Skies, United Airlines, Chicago
Funky Skies, United Airlines, Chicago

United Airlines

In 1977, I embarked on a new chapter by joining the headquarters of United Airlines (UA) in Chicago, where I assumed the role of a staff architect responsible for overseeing the designs of airport facilities and ticket offices.

During my time at United, one notable project involved crafting a glass security partition for the Executive Suite. Yielding to the temptation to inject a touch of humor, I conceived a series of cartoons titled "Life Behind the Glass Curtain." Initially shared with a select group of close colleagues, to my surprise, these cartoons gained an underground following. Their popularity reached unexpected heights when the Chief Security Officer approached me, requesting a high-quality copy of the cartoons. It turned out that my creation had become widely known within the company, with even the CEO possessing a copy. The CEO found them amusing and frequently shared them with others, demonstrating a delightful revelation about the company's top executive having a good sense of humor, even when humorously portrayed in the cartoons with his pants down.

 

Funky Skies, United Airlines, Chicago
Funky Skies, United Airlines, Chicago
Funky Skies, United Airlines, Chicago
Funky Skies, United Airlines, Chicago
Funky Skies, United Airlines, Chicago
1979 SKYLAB IS FALLING
Funky Skies, United Airlines, Chicago

USED TO SEE THE GREAT WALL AND NOW
THE YANGTZE RIVER DAM.

Funky Skies, United Airlines, Chicago
Funky Skies, United Airlines, Chicago
Funky Skies, United Airlines, Chicago
Funky Skies, United Airlines, Chicago
Funky Skies, United Airlines, Chicago
Funky Skies, United Airlines, Chicago

Sorry, too many metals

on your body....

13-WJ-05112006 YANGTZE DAM
Funky Skies, United Airlines, Chicago
Funky Skies, United Airlines, Chicago

UPSIDE DOWN,
DUDE.

Funky Skies, United Airlines, Chicago
Funky Skies, United Airlines, Chicago
Chicago, Wills/Sears Tower, High Rises

Sears Tower
 

Completed in 1973 in Chicago, the Sears Tower, now known as the Wells Tower, predated my settlement in the city by a year, as I arrived in 1994. The mastermind behind its structural engineering was Dr. Fazlur Khan.

Dr. Fazlur Khan's initial foray into purely tubular design was evident in Chicago's 43-story Dewitt-Chestnut Apartments (1965- ). His architectural prowess extended to the iconic 100-story John Hancock Building (1968- ), distinguished by prominent exterior trusses, leading to the designation of a trussed tube style. According to Khan's daughter, Yasmin Khan, his blueprint for the 108-story Willis (Sears) Tower (1973- ) was inspired by a pack of cigarettes, a concept known as bundled tubes. Dr. Khan continued to leave his mark on the architectural landscape with various notable buildings, and his design principles reverberate in the construction of most ultra-tall buildings globally, exemplified by the Burj Khalifa in Dubai in 2010, 28 years after his passing in 1982.

During my time at IIT, Dr. Khan graced us with his presence on multiple occasions, sharing insights on high-rise building design concepts. I had the privilege of meeting him several times, seeking his guidance for my graduate thesis. It was during these interactions that he introduced me to the innovative concept of a cable-stayed structure.

Sears Tower design inspiration
Sears Tower
Take out boxes, Taipei 101

Upside down, dude.

Used to be able to see the Great Wall now we see the Yahtzee River Dam.

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